Assuming the post was true, it was pretty ridiculous and screams, “I’m so insecure and need validation at all times!” She’s assuming they don’t joke with her because she’s fat, so really, she’s imposing this fat discrimination onto herself. 
"Wah, why don’t my friends joke with ME?" Like, if that’s your main problem, you need to go out into the real world. Do the ice bucket challenge or something so you’re not making it about you. 
-Mod L

Assuming the post was true, it was pretty ridiculous and screams, “I’m so insecure and need validation at all times!” She’s assuming they don’t joke with her because she’s fat, so really, she’s imposing this fat discrimination onto herself. 

"Wah, why don’t my friends joke with ME?" Like, if that’s your main problem, you need to go out into the real world. Do the ice bucket challenge or something so you’re not making it about you. 

-Mod L

Anonymous said: do you think that thin privilege exists?

askaradfem:

Hmm. While I do think that fat people get discriminated against because of their weight, Idk if I would call what thin people get instead “privilege”. I think that word should be reserved for actual systemic oppression.

- Pi

thisisthinprivilege:

I’m the sole fat person in my whole group of friends. Normally my friends are great and there’s hardly any talk about dieting or gushing over how anyone looks other than a quick “Cute outfit!” When the first of my group of friends got pregnant, she had spent weeks complaining about not feeling well, like she had the flu that never went away, before she finally went to the doctor and found out she was pregnant. Ever since then, anytime anyone else complains about not feeling very well or being tired, we all jokingly ask if she’s pregnant.

However, not once has anyone jokingly asked me, ever. I’m not sure if they assume I don’t get laid even though I have a boyfriend, or maybe they assume I have reproductive problems because of my size, or perhaps they’re just horrified at the thought of my having sex and/or producing a fat child, but even the girls who list off all the reasons they could never get pregnant still have that joke made. Not me, not once, nobody even jokes that I could possibly be pregnant.

It’s a silly joke, and I don’t take it personal or feel hurt over it, but even when you’re among great friends who never seem fat phobic, it’s these tiny subtle things that slip in there and make you see a new side to them. They probably don’t even notice.

Can someone fill me in on how something is ‘slipped’ into a conversation or interaction when you’re complaining of a blatant absence of it? You can’t complain about a lack of something and then try to say that it’s been put into the conversation, or even implied. Nothing has been implied because literally nothing has happened….?

- e

cosmopolitanchick:

That song also really skinny shames.

I’m sorry to be a wet blanket, but I really don’t like a song that says “fuck those skinny bitches” when I’m in all intents and purposes, a skinny bitch.

I thought Nicki Minaj is supposed to be a feminist icon. I had nothing against her personally, I just didn’t really like her music, but this isn’t really okay. And the fact that basically no one’s going to say anything about it shows the double standards regarding thin shaming.

theofficialnorthkorea said: thank you mod E for acknowledging that someone can be slightly overweight or slightly underweight and still be healthy

You don’t need to thank me for not being a douche. It pretty much comes standard with any decent human being.

- e

danielle-grace said: I would disagree that it's people of a "non-average size" that struggle. I am very much an average size and average measurements, but it's still difficult to find flattering clothes because the sizing and measurements of clothes vary so wildly, it's rare for me to find clothes that actually fit.

Obviously there’s always exceptions. -Mod L

cosmopolitanchick:

socialjusticeworriers:

image

cosmopolitanchick reblogged your photoset and added:
A lot of people have those natural body types…

I was actually going to address this in my initial post because I knew it would be brought up but wanted to keep it short. Anyway, lets be real here, very few women are “naturally” 5’9 and 100lbs.

How many 'naturally underweight' people do you know? Because I know some very thin chicks who are considered (medically) underweight but none of them have emaciated, gaunt looking faces. Some of these models today really DO look like Holocaust survivors and it’s gotten so bad that magazine editors are now having to airbrush/photoshop the prints to diminish the sharp looking bones on some of them.

My mom modeled in the 80s & 90s and back then, even though the Cindy Crawford body type was what was hot, models were still starving themselves silly, taking cocaine, nibbling celery and/or purging and after “Heroin Chic” became “in vogue” the problem only worsened.

And a lot of what was said (though not the most politely worded) was true. Look at recent wide surveys of men. The majority of men AREN’T attracted to those body types, but that’s largely in part due to biology. A millennia ago, a rail thin woman would not likely be able to carry a child nor nurse it to term, and certainly not two, or five more. Therefore, biologically, men are less attracted to that type.

Are all women who are this thin suffering from eating disorders? Of course not. But it takes some extreme mental gymnastics to convince yourself that all these women are just 'naturally thin' and also just so happen to be tall andhave beautiful faces appealing to the fashion industry. That’s a trifecta a perfection that frankly few people are legitimately able to achieve.

Could the posters have been more polite? Yeah, but we’re not always all that calm and polite when we see SJWs saying stupid shit because we’re outraged and/or just irritated by it so…

No, I agree that eating disorders and the pressure to stay thin is rampant in the fashion industry, and it’s unhealthy. However, it is still not okay to assume these things about people just by looking at them. 

Candice Swanepoel is naturally tall and skinny, and she can’t even do too much cardio or she’ll lose weight really fast. Karlie Kloss is also naturally skinny, so is Kate Moss. Natasha Poly, a very skinny model was able to get pregnant and have a child, something an anorexic clearly cannot do. 

Many models and celebrities are naturally skinny, are unable to put on any weight and they have so many anorexia rumors about them. This is not fair.

Because even though there are quite a few models in the industry that do have these problems and even though the standards are extreme, it’s still not okay to associate that body type with anorexia. You do not know enough about them or their bodies to make such a diagnosis. 

I agree that the fashion industry is incredibly problematic and creates unrealistic beauty standards, because the grand majority of us aren’t going to be that thin, and it’s unfair for us to feel like we’re any lesser for it. But it’s completely unfair to judge the models themselves and assume that they may or may not have a certain condition. 

According to the DSM IV, the criteria for anorexia: 

*Refusal to maintain body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and  height, for example, weight loss leading to maintenance of body weight less than 85%  of that expected or failure to make expected weight gain during period of growth,  leading to body weight less than 85% of that expected.

Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight.

Disturbance in the way one’s body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence  of body weight or shape on self evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of the current  low body weight.

In postmenarcheal females, amenorrhea, i.e., the absence of at least 3 consecutive  menstrual cycles. A woman having periods only while on hormone medication (e.g.  estrogen) still qualifies as having amenorrhea.

Sure, we know that these women are extremely skinny. But do we know their menstrual cycles? Their attitudes about their body weight? We don’t. And it’s completely unfair to assume. And even if you have certain problems about how thin someone else is, it’s still completely uncalled for to make a sweeping generalization about how unattractive they are to men. 

So to sum up, I believe that the fashion industry is very problematic, but I don’t think anything is to be gained by judging someone’s body at face value. 

cosmopolitanchick:

I found all these comments on the same article about Calvin Klein models. Tell me again that thin shaming doesn’t exist. 

Absolutely disgusting. 

Anonymous said: growing up I was constantly hearing things like "you'll be fat in five years" from people who hate that I'm skinny. to the point that I developed an eating disorder. Recovery is a choice every day. When people make comments about how skinny I am, it upsets the constant battle of recovering from an eating disorder: we hate ourselves for eating too much and we hate ourselves for eating too little. So don't tell me it's "privileged" to be smothered with your own mental struggles. ty for this blog

Sorry for your struggles. Keep keeping on!

-Mod L

Anonymous said: What Titp can't grasp is very few people can find clothes that fit well I 'm 5' and 96 pounds, and many stores don't carry below a 4!I started kickboxing at 13, now my shoulders and back are too built to fit any women's shirt my size, or the size up!

I would disagree that “very few” people can find clothes that fit. Most people can find clothes that fit - it’s the people who are non-average sizes who have issues.

-Mod L